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The History of Mexico, Maine


In 1789 at Sutton, Massachusetts, the territory known as “Township Number 1” was purchased by Colonel Johnathan Holman and Associates from the Committee for Sale of Eastern Lands. The township was later called Holmanstown and contained 30,020 acres, encompassing what is now the towns of Mexico and Dixfield. Separation into two towns took place in 1803, at which time Dixfield was incorporated, and Holmanstown kept its name. Governed as a plantation until it was incorporated into a town in 1818 under the laws of Massachusetts, of which state, Maine was yet a part. The town is described in history as being “chiefly devoted to her own interests.”  The unique name to this area was inspired by local sympathy for the country of Mexico’s 1810–1821 fight for independence from Spain.

In February 1818, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts passed as act to establish the Town of Mexico in the County of Oxford. Section 2 of that act instructed that “the inhabitants thereof to meet at such convenient time and place as shall be appointed in the said warrant for the choice of such officers as towns are by law empowered and required to choose, at their annual town meetings. The bill passed the House of Representatives on February 12, 1818, and the Senate on February 13, 1818.

As found in the Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Chap. 0106 An Act to establish the town of Mexico, in the county of Oxford.

Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, That the Plantation here-tofore called Holmanstown, on the north side of Great Amariskoggin River, in the county of Oxford, as contained within the following described boundaries, be, and the same is hereby incorporated and established as a town, by the name of Mexico, viz. easterly by Webb’s river, (the present bounds between Dixfield and said Holmanstown.) southerly by the river Great Amaris-koggin, westerly by the town of Rumford, northerly by the townships or plantations numbered four and seven. And the inhabitants of the said town of Mexico, are hereby vested with all the powers and privileges, and shall be also subject to all the duties and requisitions of other corporate towns, according to the constitution and laws of this Commonwealth.

Sec. 2, Be it further enacted. That any Justice of the Peace for the county of Oxford, upon application therefor, is hereby empowered to issue a warrant, directed to a freehold inhabitant of the said town of Mexico, requiring him to notify and warn the inhabitants thereof to meet at such convenient time and place, as shall be appointed in the said warrant, for the choice of such officers, as towns are by law empowered and required to choose at their annual town meeting.

[Approved by the Governor, February 13, 1818.]